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October 17, 2007

Food Blogs

Now there's a world I have no knowledge of. But I found yesterday's discussion on canned tuna so enlightening that I'd like to give it a shot. So: Anyone have suggestions of fun food blogs to read?

And while you're thinking about that, here's some delicious-sounding advice that directly contradicts Mario Batali's: "Instead of a pound of pasta for two to four people, make a half, or even a third of a pound. Instead of a cup or two of sauce, make it four cups, or more. Turn the proportions around. What do you wind up with? Pasta more or less overwhelmed by sauce, which you can view as a cardinal sin or as a moist, flavorful one-dish meal of vegetables with the distinctive, lovable chewiness of pasta."

The pictures are pretty, and making me very hungry. And try not to feel gluttonous when you get to the part about folks in the old country rubbing their plain slices of bread across a hanging herring in order to absorb a little flavor into their diets.

October 17, 2007 | Permalink

Comments

I'll have to pimp my friend's food blog - mostly Asian food in and around DC (and on his travels, in Asia). All Taste Same

Posted by: Jeremy | Oct 17, 2007 1:02:01 PM

atrios plugged me into a great foodie blog (that, alas, has not seen an update in awhile), syllabub

Posted by: verplanck colvin | Oct 17, 2007 1:13:51 PM

For pure volume of esoteric content, it's hard to beat Tastespotting -- it's like the Fark of food blogs (minus the insane comments).

Posted by: Daniel Munz | Oct 17, 2007 1:20:56 PM

There's nothing wrong with making a dish that's heavy on the sauce and light on the pasta. It can be delicious, especially with veggie-heavy (or legume-heavy) sauces, as the article notes. But it's not really an Italian "pasta" dish -- more like a stew or a French-style couscous, but instead of using rice or tiny little grains, you use pasta to add filler and texture.

One recommendation, though -- you need to use "short" pasta, like penne or rig, to do this. It doesn't work so well with spaghetti or linguine-style long noodles.

Posted by: Joe | Oct 17, 2007 1:39:06 PM

Not a blog but a great cooking site: http://www.cookingforengineers.com/

And if you love cupcakes: http://www.cupcakeblog.com/

Posted by: Yasminah | Oct 17, 2007 2:03:46 PM

I like Chocolate & Zucchini, Simply Recipes; and Just Hungry for its insights into Japanese food.

Posted by: pseudonymous in nc | Oct 17, 2007 2:06:30 PM

Italian pasta is better quality than what we get over here, so it makes sense that Mario Batali would underemphasize sauce. Given the pasta I'm eating I like to load up on the sauce.

Posted by: Jacob | Oct 17, 2007 2:08:23 PM

And yes, Bittman isn't contradicting Mario Batali: like Joe said, he's just offering set of recipes that aren't particularly Italian, but do include pasta. Mario's all about getting away from 'generic Italian' to do authentic regional recipes, but also carry what makes recipes authentic to his kitchen.

Posted by: pseudonymous in nc | Oct 17, 2007 2:12:20 PM

anything by mark bittman in the times is good. his videos are fun too - and filled with groan-inducing humor.

Posted by: David | Oct 17, 2007 2:12:41 PM

Other folks have already listed some of my favorite foodblogs, but here's one that (while not strictly a foodblog) has a lot of good food and recipe stuff:

Rhosgobel: Radagast's Home

Posted by: nolo | Oct 17, 2007 2:22:20 PM

applesbananas.blogspot.com


Well worth it.

Posted by: Marc | Oct 17, 2007 2:37:27 PM

Here's another one I like:

Hungry tiger

Posted by: nolo | Oct 17, 2007 2:45:02 PM

Corduroy Orange is quite good.

Posted by: SamChevre | Oct 17, 2007 2:48:47 PM

One of my favorites is Deglazed, stories from a designer/marketer turned chef from right outside of DC. Author Matt is now in the kitchen at beer paradise Rustico in Alexandria.

Since I'm commenting I'll also plug a group food blog I write for, though updates are few these days:
www.eatfoo.com.

Posted by: Jacob Grier | Oct 17, 2007 3:00:33 PM

Mine - burritophile. Not much DC content, though, as the burritos in DC are legendarily horrid.

Posted by: Dan | Oct 17, 2007 3:11:41 PM

A couple local to Washington, since you live here:

dcist.com/food_and_drink/2007/10
www.dcfoodies.com

Not a blog but a discussion forum and online community:

www.donrockwell.com

Posted by: Herschel | Oct 17, 2007 3:13:30 PM

Batali is about making his version of authentic Italian pasta, which to him comes down to pasta=cheap, sauce=expensive, so naturally the sauce would then but the undercurrent flavor meant to enhance the center piece which is the pasta. Personally, the more sauce and the more cheese the better I say.

I do enjoy watching him make pasta from scratch and have ventured forth more than a few times with home made gnocchi (which turned out wonderful) and ravioli. I can't for the life of me create noodles of any sort, but, maybe that requires more skill than I have.

Posted by: Fred | Oct 17, 2007 3:21:35 PM

I have Slashfood, Cooking for Engineers (though it's rarely updated), Ideas in Food and Simply Recipes in my RSS feed. Despite its really boring name, Ideas in Food is the most exciting one - lots of experimental, thoughtful and amazing food by a pair of chefs.

Posted by: Sara | Oct 17, 2007 3:35:08 PM

Everyone in the greater Washington area needs to bookmark Tyler Cowen's Ethnic Dining Guide.

I also like Waiter Rant; not a food blog like some of these others, but a great read.

Posted by: Carl | Oct 17, 2007 3:58:21 PM

Chez Pim makes me weepy, not only because she's a fabulous writer about food, but she's a lovely brilliant woman with enough disposable income to fly from SF to London to fix a meal for some friends.

http://www.chezpim.typepad.com/

I want to be her when I grow up.

Posted by: Morfydd | Oct 17, 2007 5:27:50 PM

Michael Ruhlman's blog is great. He's an author, classically trained chef, and current judge on Next Iron Chef (he's blogging about each episode). Great writing and insight, even for those non-chefs among us, and he's really funny. As a huge bonus (for me), Anthony Bourdain is a frequent poster and commenter.

http://blog.ruhlman.com/

Posted by: Jumada | Oct 17, 2007 6:14:38 PM

The Paupered Chef, co-authored by a friend of mine. The Wash. Post printed a recipe of theirs not too long ago.

Posted by: Andrew | Oct 17, 2007 6:36:06 PM

Whoops: http://www.thepauperedchef.com

Posted by: Andrew | Oct 17, 2007 6:37:33 PM

"And while you're thinking about that, here's some delicious-sounding advice that directly contradicts Mario Batali's: "Instead of a pound of pasta for two to four people, make a half, or even a third of a pound. Instead of a cup or two of sauce, make it four cups, or more. Turn the proportions around. What do you wind up with? Pasta more or less overwhelmed by sauce, which you can view as a cardinal sin or as a moist, flavorful one-dish meal of vegetables with the distinctive, lovable chewiness of pasta.""

Jeez... It's not like I offered this precise advice in the last food thread at 9:42pm or anything...

Posted by: Petey | Oct 17, 2007 7:14:54 PM

There are scores of great food writers (and photographers) out there. Here are a few of my favorites:

I think you'd like The Ethicurean, one of the blogs I write for (under the name "Marc R."). It often delves into food politics, ethics, and other semi-wonky topics. For example, the Farm Bill or USDA rule-making around the term "grass fed" for beef. There are also plenty of posts about cooking, like someone's first try at cooking beef tongue, or what it was like to can tomatoes, or how to make a vegetarian version of Chiles en Nogada (poblano chiles stuffed with vegetables, dried fruit and spices, then topped with a walnut sauce and pomegranate seeds). The site also has a round-up of the news in food politics every few days. The collection of links on the sidebar will bring you to many more food politics/food ethics blogs.

David Lebovitz is an American pastry chef and cookbook author living in Paris with a great sense of humor and lots of insights into cooking and baking.

Eggbeater is written by a pastry chef in San Francisco and has an eclectic flavor, e.g. insights into restaurant kitchens, baking tips, poetry, notes about ingredients.

The Accidental Hedonist is interesting --- at its strongest when covering about food politics.

For Southeast Asian food, Eating Asia, Real Thai, and Rasa Malaysia are at the top of my list.

Posted by: Marc | Oct 17, 2007 7:18:06 PM

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