« The Mommy Diaries | Main | The (Lack of) Power of Prayer »

July 17, 2005

Sunday Nonfiction

I told you I was going to stick with this. Yesterday was fiction, today is fact, tomorrow is music. The rules are I put down what I'm reading with my comments and you put down what you're reading with your comments. Or, if you're illiterate, you can just talk about what other people are reading. Off we go:

Nick Hornby's The Polysyllabic Spree: Couldn't pass this one up. It's a collection of essays Hornby wrote for The Believer on "one man's struggle with the monthly tide of books he's bought and book he's been meaning to read." Welcome to my life.

Earl Malt's Rehnquist Justice: Collection of academic essays on the Rehnquist Court, one for each Justice. Trying to bone up on what each member means to the country's judicial direction, and thus what it means when one or another retires.

Tony Horwitz's Confederates in the Attic: A narrative book exploring Civil War culture. Hardcore reenactors, confederate flag crimes, the Daughters of the Confederacy, and so forth. I could never live in it, but it's worth trying to understand.

Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America: Term paper, so I had to choose from the poli-sci canon. Figured I should use de Tocqueville so I can ostentatiously inject it into articles later on, making folks think I'm erudite without actually reading through the classics.

Your turn.

July 17, 2005 in Books | Permalink

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c572d53ef00d834624c8169e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Sunday Nonfiction:

Comments

Niall Ferguson's The Pity of War. Haven't read any of his other books, and his neocon-British empire defending and general revisionist background gives me some pause, but I'm taking a class on that time frame in Europe in the fall, and The Proud Tower didn't seem as interesting as I'd hoped, so it's best to start somewhere, and Ferguson doesn't just write about artillery and the German General Staff, there's some social stuff, or at least there is some promised as I'm only on page xxvii.

Posted by: SamAm | Jul 17, 2005 11:52:52 PM

Plus, it was in the library.

Posted by: SamAm | Jul 17, 2005 11:55:43 PM

Robert Coover's The Origin of the Brunists, Michael Klare's Resource Wars, Matt Taibbi's book and Rilke's biography of Rodin. I'll be reading them for a while. I read really slowly so I have to choose carefully.

Posted by: firedoglake | Jul 18, 2005 12:26:35 AM

I like Taibbi, but he's such a goddamn nihilist I can't stand him after awhile. He exists to mock, and I just can't respect that. Would that he used his sharp-as-shit pen for good, not evil.

Posted by: Ezra | Jul 18, 2005 1:10:15 AM

I'm reading Jeff Chang's Can't Stop, Won't Stop: A History of the Hip Hop Generation. I'm about half-way through, but it's a solid read. It pulls together a lot of disparate threads and examines hip hop and its relationship to societal trends. That sentence-long synopsis doesn't really do justice, though. It's less text bookish than that and is more of a narrative. I recommend it.

Posted by: Drew | Jul 18, 2005 2:56:21 AM

I'm going through Ron Chernow's "Alexander Hamilton" as an audio book. As for the stuff made of actual tree fibers, I'm reading "Life at the extremes" by Francis M Ashcroft.

Posted by: battlepanda | Jul 18, 2005 8:47:31 AM

STATE of FEAR by Chrichton
Picked this up simply because he has been a really easy read in the past and also attempts to explain the science behind the story and this one deals with the global warming issue. Haven't really read any reviews good or bad on this but will know in a few days if I'm going to like it.

Posted by: Robert Zimmerman | Jul 18, 2005 9:42:03 AM

I. The Road to Reality : A Complete Guide to the Laws of the Universe Roger Penrose

This book lays out the mathematical foundations for the study of the physics of the universe such as general relativity.

(I will be reading this book for a long time)

II. The anchestor's Tale: A pilgrimage to the dawn of evolution Richard Dawkins

A technical view of the common anchestry of life on earth.

III. The collected Stories of Eudora Welty (fiction) 41 of Eudora's stories in one book!

Posted by: George | Jul 18, 2005 12:59:40 PM

State of Fear doesn't quite belong here. It is most definately fiction, in more ways than one. The basic premise of the book is that environmentalists, frustrated by the failure of their "sky is falling" rhetoric, begin CAUSING natural disasters to convince the public that global warming is a serious threat, and therefore more stringent environmental legislation is needed. Never mind the sheer lunacy of this plot device, Chrichton also rejects outright the vast majority of scientists who agree that global warming is a real threat, and instead casts his lot with the cranks of the scientific community, those who read uncertainty about the effects of climate change as meaning we should ignore it completely.

Chris Mooney takes apart the novel rather nicely here.

Posted by: Matt F | Jul 18, 2005 3:29:27 PM

Ladies and Gentlemen, The Bronx Is Burning, don't have the author's name handy (I'm at work). A portrait of New York in 1977, featuring a wild Democratic mayoral primary, Reggie vs Billy, Son of Sam, and the blackout.

Posted by: Thlayli | Jul 18, 2005 8:14:05 PM

The second part of Democracy in America is much more interesting and much more significant as analysis of American culture and politics than the first half, which is where all the famous stuff on New England town meetings is. I read DiA when I was a sophomore in college, during Ross Perot's first presidential bid. I was struck at how prescient and accurate Tocqueville's analysis of the American psyche is. The subsequent rise of George Bush makes it all the more evident.

I have to confess that I have nothing to contribute to the nonfiction version of this thread, since my current reading list mostly consists of books made out of cardboard with less than ten pages (Beep beep, sheep in a jeep on a hill that's steep!). The last nonfiction that I read was Fast Food Nation, and I'm never eating at McDonalds again.

Posted by: Mrs. Coulter | Jul 18, 2005 11:12:06 PM

Samantha Power's 'A Problem from Hell', which only underscores our understanding of the current regime's pantomimed concern for 'evil,' whether in Iraq or Darfur. Especially interesting is Power's discussion of the consistent refusas of American presidencies, spanning five decades, to actually use the term 'genocide.' To begin with, the US neglected — scratch that, refused — to ratify the 1948 convention on genocide until 1986, as a conga line of shitheads and paranoiacs invoked the very arguments that would later undermine the establishment of the ICC. This was done not merely out of (what should have been appropriate) recognition that the genocide convention might just well have described the conditions inflicted upon Native Americans, but also because invoking the word 'genocide' after 1948 would have committed signatories to concrete, meaningful actions in defense of international law.

Posted by: Axis of Evel Knievel | Jul 19, 2005 2:39:39 AM

"Left Behind Vol. 1" It's all true.

but seriously folks,

"My Country Right or Left Essays, Letters and Journalism of Orwell 1940-1943"

Amazing start to finish. Most interesting are his views on the various political factions in the run-up to and start of Britain's involvement in WWII. MOst all of this stuff still applies. So good it hurts. the occasional literary review he offers up is always a nice treat as well.

Posted by: Kermit | Jul 19, 2005 6:51:42 AM

托盘
托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘
木托盘
木制托盘
纸托盘
木塑托盘

托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘

托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘
托盘

托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
钢托盘
木托盘
钢制托盘
托盘
塑料托盘

托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘

托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘
木托盘
南京托盘
南京钢托盘
上海托盘

托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘
木托盘
南京托盘
南京钢托盘
上海托盘

托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘
木托盘
纸托盘
南京托盘
上海托盘
北京托盘
广州托盘
杭州托盘
成都托盘
武汉托盘
长沙托盘
合肥托盘
苏州托盘
无锡托盘
昆山托盘

托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘
木托盘
纸托盘
南京托盘
南京钢制托盘
南京钢托盘
上海托盘
北京托盘

托盘
托盘
托盘
托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘
塑料托盘
塑料托盘

托盘
塑料托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
铁托盘
托盘
钢托盘
铁托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘

托盘
钢托盘
铁托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘
托盘
钢托盘
铁托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘

托盘
托盘
钢托盘
钢托盘
铁托盘
铁托盘
钢制托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘
塑料托盘

托盘
钢托盘
铁托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘
托盘
钢托盘
铁托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘
托盘
钢托盘
铁托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘

托盘
钢托盘
铁托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘
托盘
托盘
托盘
钢托盘
铁托盘
钢制托盘
塑料托盘

托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
铁托盘
塑料托盘
木托盘
木制托盘
纸托盘
木塑托盘
柱式托盘
波纹托盘
镀锌托盘
南京托盘
上海托盘
北京托盘
广州托盘
托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
铁托盘
塑料托盘
木托盘
木制托盘
纸托盘
木塑托盘
柱式托盘
波纹板托盘
镀锌托盘
南京托盘
上海托盘
北京托盘
广州托盘

托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
铁托盘
塑料托盘
木托盘
木制托盘
纸托盘
木塑托盘
柱式托盘
波纹托盘
镀锌托盘
南京托盘
上海托盘
北京托盘
广州托盘
托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
铁托盘
木托盘
塑料托盘
木塑托盘
柱式托盘
波纹板托盘
镀锌托盘
南京托盘
上海托盘
北京托盘
广州托盘

托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
铁托盘
塑料托盘
木托盘
木制托盘
纸托盘
木塑托盘
柱式托盘
波纹托盘
镀锌托盘
南京托盘
上海托盘
北京托盘
广州托盘
托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
铁托盘
塑料托盘
木托盘
纸托盘
木塑托盘
柱式托盘
波纹板托盘
镀锌托盘
南京托盘
上海托盘
北京托盘
广州托盘


托盘
钢托盘
钢制托盘
托盘
塑料托盘

Posted by: peter.w | Sep 17, 2007 2:55:18 AM

The comments to this entry are closed.